Concorde and the future of supersonic travel!

Concorde ran from 1969 to 2003.

Amy Aviation is on a tour of the UK, visiting places well-known for their connection with UK aeronautics!

Today she’s in Filton, which is near Bristol.

Airplane production began in Filton over 100 years ago in 1910!

Filton was home to the Bristol Fighter plane that was used to defend the skies in the First World War – it was the Spitfire of its day…

It’s also where the Blenheim was made – that was a fighter used by the Royal Air Force in the early days of World War II.

Filton has also been home to the manufacture of helicopters and even satellites. But one of its most famous developments was Concorde.

Concorde was a passenger jet developed by the British and French. It was launched in the 1970s and could travel at supersonic speeds.

It could fly between London and New York in as little as two and a half hours – reaching speeds of 1,300mph!

This incredible plane was designed and assembled in Filton. 20 planes were built but only 14 ever entered service.

The cabin was quite small, with room for only 120 passengers. Compare that with over 600 who can fly on an Airbus A380!

Concordes don’t fly any more and although in their day they used some of the most advanced technology available, they now take their place in aviation history.

You can see the remaining Concordes at airfields around the world – including at Filton.

But the idea of supersonic travel isn’t over…

With advancements in materials and aerodynamics, a number of companies are looking again at supersonic passenger planes. We may well see one again within a decade.

Check out this supersonic concept plane from NASA!

Click here to get more from Amy’s Aviation!

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Amy's Aviation: Kids Guide to Airplanes & Airports

The podcast that discovers how airplanes fly and what goes on behind-the-scenes at airports

 

Amy Aviation’s British Aeronautics, with support from the Royal Aeronautical Society!

 

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