Britain’s Digital Railways

Find out about Britain's railways - from signals and trains to tracks and safety!

Level crossings and what they mean: Find out about the different types of crossing here!

Find out more about the types of crossings below

Level crossings enable people and vehicles to safely cross the railway.

It’s important that we cross at level crossings and that we follow the rules of the crossing. The main thing is that we do not cross if the barriers or lights tell us not to, no matter how tempting it may be.

There are different types of level crossing and they don’t all look the same.

The main types you’re most likely to encounter are barrier crossings (full or half), or an open crossing. There are also footpath crossings, found mainly in rural areas.

Full barrier crossings have warning lights and an alarm. Barriers cover the whole road and the alarm stops once the barriers are lowered.

Half barrier crossings have just one barrier that covers half the road and an alarm that continues until the barrier is raised again. It is important not to walk around the barrier. Remember, if the barrier is down it means a train is coming – and if the barrier hasn’t lifted after a train has passed through, it means another is on its way.

At a barrier crossing, don’t go around or jump the barrier when it is closing or down. Instead:

STOP when you see the red lights flashing and hear the alarm ringing – stay behind the white line.

WAIT if the red lights carry on flashing after the train has gone by – another train will be passing soon.

WALK only when the lights go off and the barriers open. Look both ways when you are crossing.

You can find out more about how to stay safe on or around the railway in our series about rail safety, Track Pack.

MOBILE: Kids Guide to Transport: Rail and Road

Bex and Dan learn all about the future of Britain's roads and railways!

Add a comment

Britain’s Digital Railways

Find out about Britain's railways - from signals and trains to tracks and safety!